Wednesday, January 16, 2013

The luckiest girl in the world.

Almost a year has passed since I last blogged. As I'm sure you've all gathered now (and by "you all" I'm clearly assuming that anyone still checks in on this blog) I stop writing when life is going well. So you can probably also gather from that that life is going very well indeed.

I just feel so incredibly lucky to have this wonderful life I have now, thanks to organ donation; to my donor, to the hospitals and staff who saved me, to my family and friends who kept me going.

Six years on and life is magical. I am working in a job I love, I own a house and have to worry about things like the mortgage, council tax, and bills. I am edging ever closer to 30, an age which at one point I was convinced I'd never see. I am normal. Life is normal. Life is wonderful. And this year, life is about to become that little bit more special as I am going to become a mummy.

Several years ago, A and I embarked on a surrogacy journey which would prove to be quite a roller coaster. Surrogacy is essentially where some very special individual offers to carry your baby for you, and is done for those who cannot carry their own child for whatever reason. Mine was the risk it posed to these precious new lungs; it was ill-advisable and I knew I could not risk jeopardising this gift.

You can find out all about our surrogacy escapades on mine and Niki's (the incredible woman who is doing all this for us) joint blog: www.cheeseteamcakesjourney.blogspot.com.

Please remember to keep spreading the word about organ donation; there are so many people out there waiting to embark on this potential chapter in their life which is currently just out of their reach. People like Sam, like Kerry, who are still waiting for their new life to begin.

Click here to sign the organ donor register.


11 comments:

Theresa said...

Oh Emily I am SO thrilled for you! I've been following your blog since before your transplant and this is just magical news!

Molly said...

Congratulations! I'm so pleased for you :) x

Sammie said...

I'm so pleased for you Emily, and so so happy to read about your baby news. Your sharing of your experiences really helps keep me going during this tough waiting period! Wishing you and your family all the best for this year. Much love, Sam xxx
PS: hooked out the old Florida photos a while back - amazing holiday!

Kat said...

For some reason I can't comment on your other blog...not sure why, probably just me being a bit dense...! Anywho, I'll paste my comment here instead!

First of all can I just say that I cannot even express how excited I am for you! :D :D :D

As a midwife working in a hospital I can understand why some of the rules we have in place are (usually) necessary, for example limiting the number of birthing partners allowed in any one room and having strict visiting hours for non-partners are aimed at reducing infection and security risks. However, I am surprised that some hospitals are not more flexible when it comes to accomodating surrogate mothers and intended parents!

I know where I work we would allow one more person in the room for labour and birth (the only exception would be in theatre) so that both intended parents as well as the surrogate's partner/mother/sister (whoever she wanted to be there) etc could be present, and that following the birth we would enable both the surrogate mother to remain in hospital to recover, as well as admitting the intended mother (in her own bed, preferably in a single side-room) to room-in, bond with, feed, and care for her baby. This means that both women's partners are able to visit during extended visiting times (although not usually stay overnight as, obviously, postnatal wards are all-female wards!), rather than during the limited times open to all other visitors. This happens despite our desperate need for more beds, and so I cannot understand why other (especially quieter) units cannot provide the same service. I can't say I've had any experience in which a baby born by a surrogate mother has had to go to NICU/SCBU (and I hope this isn't something you will have to encounter) but I imagine the staff on the postnatal ward and neonatal unit would do everything possible to allow the intended parents to spend as much time as possible with their baby, as well as providing whatever medical/recovery care the surrogate mother requires.

I really hope the hospital at which you're booked is as flexible as possible and does everything they can to accomodate your situation, especially as they've had prior notice, and you all have the birth experience you're hoping for! Hopefully none of you will need to spend too much time in hospital anyway, and you and A can enjoy your little bundle in the comfort of your own home before too long :)

Again, soooo excited for you! :)

Muchly love, Kat xxx

Woody said...

That's great news! I miss your posts but am glad you are so well not to post :)

Anonymous said...

Dear Emily so pleased and happy for you and A. You're embarking on a new and excititng journey and I wish you all the joys its possible to hold in your hearts. Live it...and keep breathing. Love Linda Jane

suzie said...

Oh my good grief!!!! I can't believe I missed this news when you posted it (thank you Linda for directing me to this update) Em I am sooooo happy for you and A and both of your families. What absolutely wonderful news, congratulations. x x x

Katie H said...

Wow Emily, what lovely news, I'm so happy and excited for you both. Katie H

Bitter_Angel said...

WOW Emily, congrats! You will make a super fab mum. If its a girl, I can image her whole wardrobe and room and everything she owns to be pink ha.
Good luck with everything and so glad things are going so well.
Kim

Sankar Kumar said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
Muneer Hussian said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.